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Workshops

Thursday 27 June, 9.00am - 12.00pm

Option 1: W1 - Science informing policy: the end user perspective

Venue

Stanley Burbury Theatre - Main Auditorium

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Jason Mundy - Australian Antarctic Division
  • Tony Press - Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC
  • Julia Jabour - Institute Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania
  • Neil Gilbert - Antarctica New Zealand

Background

Australia and New Zealand have a shared vision for Antarctica of Valued, Protected and Understood.

Research conducted in the Antarctic and Southern Ocean plays a significant role both in responding to policy priorities and in informing and guiding policy development across a range of areas including climate change; natural resource management and biodiversity conservation; and human impact management, mitigation and remediation; and environmental protection.

Over recent years significant efforts have been made in coordinating the delivery of Antarctic Science that meet the strategic and policy needs of both nations. It remains critical that the resources and effort committed to Antarctic science are clearly aligned with national and international policy priorities.

The policy-making environment of the 21 century is extremely complex and requires interdisciplinary solutions which integrate knowledge from a range of fields including science, economic, political and social.

This workshop will:

  • discuss the existing science-policy interface at the international and domestic levels
  • explore mechanisms and processes which may be put in place to bring researchers and policy-makers closer together
  • explore ways of making results and outcomes from Antarctic science more visible and relevant to a wider audience, including politicians, policy-makers, industry and the general public
  • enable researchers to better understand policy-making needs
  • provide policy-makers with a context in which they can contribute to the development of science project results which are policy useful.

Thursday 27 June, 1.00pm-4.00pm

Option 1: W2 - Southern Ocean Observing System and Southern Ocean Sentinel: building a collaborative program to measure climate change impacts on marine ecosystems south of Australia and New Zealand

Venue

Stanley Burbury Theatre Theatre 1

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Dr Andrew Constable Australian Antarctic Division

Background

The Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS) coupled with the Southern Ocean Sentinel project of the IMBER program Integrating Climate and Ecosystem Dynamics of the Southern Ocean (ICED) are progressing implementation plans for a field observing system to measure change in Southern Ocean ecosystems (Theme 6 of the SOOS).

These programs recognise that an effective system for measuring change will require collaboration across the many nations undertaking operations (science and station support) in the region. The Southern Ocean can be divided into four sectors of interest, each with a north-south topographic features – East Pacific (including the west Antarctic Peninsula), Atlantic (including the Scotia Arc), Indian (including the Kerguelen Plateau) and West Pacific (including the Macquarie Ridge). Each of these have different prognoses for change in the physical habitats. They therefore provide a powerful natural experiment for understanding the dynamics of change in Southern Ocean ecosystems. This workshop aims to develop mechanisms for coordination and collaboration of a regional program to measure and assess change in marine ecosystems in the Indian and West Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean.

This workshop aims to:

  1. Update participants on the implementation plans for SOOS, ICED and Sentinel in order to better understand opportunities to collaborate and coordinate
  2. Collate plans and information relating to current and future activities for marine research in this region, including identifying scientists that can act as contacts in the development of a collaborative program
  3. Consider mechanisms for achieving effective collaboration across nations with an interest in this program
  4. Develop a work plan that can be used to help deliver the program into the future

Option 2: W3 - Communicating our Science: thinking big-picture

Venue

Stanley Burbury Theatre Theatre 3

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Rhian Salmon Victoria University of Wellington
  • Cliff Atkins Victoria University of Wellington

Background

Why do Antarctic scientists engage in communication, education, and outreach activities? How does this compare with the communication needs of the Australian Antarctic Division, Antarctica New Zealand and individual institutions? Who is the intended audience? What is the overall impact of these activities, how are they evaluated, and what are the professional incentives for scientists to get involved?

Public outreach and communication by scientists is now commonplace and sometimes expected, but is rarely critically examined. These activities are often time-intensive, professionally unrewarded, completed outside of normal work hours, and of no measured value by the academic system. However, they continue due to the commitment and passion of individuals involved. In addition these efforts are to a large extent responsible for public perception of science and related funding.

This workshop will explore what we want to achieve in our communication efforts, as a broad Antarctic science community, and how to to deliver effective outreach while also recognising and valuing the contributions of individuals involved.

Targeted communication and public engagement (often referred to as outreach) is an increasingly important means of highlighting the value of science to the public and also its role in informing policy and successful environmental management. Ultimately this contributes toward the jointly shared vision of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean as ‘Valued, Protected and Understood’.

This workshop will draw together key people from the science community, and Antarctic management and logistic organisations, with the intention of focussing established expertise toward developing a framework for a more coordinated, consistent and rewarded means for communicating messages about Antarctic science to the wider community.

Option 3: W4 - Ice-ocean interactions under sea ice and ice shelves: synergies and connections

Venue

Stanley Burbury Theatre Theatre 2

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Dr Mike Williams National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA)
  • Dr Roland Warner Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre / Australian Antarctic Division

Background

The physics of ice-ocean interactions controls how Antarctica’s ice shelves will respond to the predicted encroachment of warmer waters onto the continental shelves and into the cavities under the ice shelves. Sea ice both influences this encroachment and is affected by the shelf changes. Thus there are potentially profound consequences for the ice sheet, sea-level rise and the state of the Southern Ocean.

Over the past two decades field programmes, both through ice shelves and in and under sea ice, have identified ice features, like frazil ice, platelet ice, and marine ice that are not fully understood, but highlight the inadequacy of the existing simple models of ice-ocean interaction.

Australian and New Zealand scientists have played a prominent role in observing ice-ocean interaction, in a range of locations including under the Amery Ice Shelf, and in the sea ice of McMurdo Sound. These field programmes have been supported by on-going modelling work on a range of scales and domains. Despite this, there have been few attempts to bring our expertise together and focus jointly on understanding sub-ice processes.

This workshop aims to bring together researchers from both countries to explore utilising the results from the different scales intrinsic to ice shelf-ocean and sea ice-ocean interactions to understand the physical processes that govern ice formation and melt. It is anticipated the workshop will focus on: frazil and platelet ice formation, growth and deposition processes; observing and measuring systems, including results from recent field campaigns; and modelling of relevant ice and ocean processes.

Option 4: W5 - Science in the subantarctic - benefits, challenges and opportunities

Venue

Stanley Burbury Theatre Theatre 4

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Dr Dana Bergstrom Australian Antarctic Division
  • Prof Steven Chown Monash University
  • Prof Gary Wilson New Zealand Antarctic Research Institute
  • Dr Denzil Miller Antarctic Tasmania
  • Dr Mary-Anne Lea University of Tasmania
  • Prof Mark Hindell University of Tasmania
  • Dr Justine Shaw University of Queensland / Australian Antarctic Division
  • Mr Ashley Rushton Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, Tasmania
  • Mr Andy Roberts Department of Conservation, New Zealand

Background

This workshop will explore mechanisms and options available for subantarctic science now and into the future.

It will include presentations from a number of key researchers and managers involved in conducting, coordinating and managing subantarctic science from Australia and New Zealand.

The workshop will discuss the benefits from subantarctic science in the terrestrial and marine realms and will include panel-led discussions and presentations on:

  • access to Australian and New Zealand subantarctic islands now and into the future
  • end user and management needs, Australia and New Zealand
  • the role of the Macquarie Island Research Committee (MIRAG)
  • experience with other subantarctic programs, South Georgia, French subantarctic program and Prince Edwards Islands
  • opportunities for alignment of Australian and New Zealand programs

Option 5: W6 - Strategic science in Enderby Land: a scoping workshop

Venue

IMAS conference room (offsite)

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Dr Chris Carson Geoscience Australia

Background

Enderby Land, and the adjacent offshore areas, remains one of the most remote and infrequently visited regions of the Australian Antarctic Territory (AAT). This isolated and mountainous region on the western periphery of the AAT, however, offers excellent opportunities for a wide range of modern research activities.

Enderby Land has been recently highlighted as one area of potential interest for international collaboration between Australian and Japanese Government Antarctic programs in the mid-long term. As such, this workshop will explore the level of interest within the Australian Antarctic research community for strategically relevant terrestrial and marine science program in the Enderby Land region. We will attempt to determine what can be high-impact science can be efficiently and effectively achieved in a challenging logistical and financial environment.

Friday 28 June, 9.00am-12.00pm

Option 1: W7 - Towards an Australian strategy for observing the ocean beneath the ice

Venue

Stanley Burbury Theatre Theatre 2

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Dr Stephen Rintoul Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre / Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research / Wealth from Oceans National Research Flagship / CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

Background

Some of the strongest climate change signals are already underway in the high latitudes, with rapid and accelerating changes occurring where warming oceans meet ice. These changes have far-reaching effects through their impact on global sea-level rise (through changes to the major ice sheets) and warming rates (through changes to total planetary albedo). However, the polar oceans under ice are the least understood and most poorly monitored physical systems on the planet. They remain a ‘blind spot’ in our Global Climate Observing System. Many of the key scientific questions concerning the role of high latitude ice-ocean-atmosphere interactions in the climate system remain unanswered because of a paucity of observations. New technologies now allow such measurements to be made. In October 2012, an international workshop was held in Hobart to begin to develop a community strategy for under-ice observations, as part of the Southern Ocean Observing System. The scope of the strategy includes observations needed for the study of interactions between the ocean and both sea ice and glacial ice, including the sub-ice-shelf cavity and deep troughs through which warm ocean waters access the shelf region. The proposed workshop aims to build on the results of the October workshop to develop a community view of priorities for under-ice multidisciplinary observations and to discuss how Australia and New Zealand can best contribute to this international initiative.

Option 2: W8 - Effects of ocean acidification and environmental (co-) stressors on polar marine biota: Assessing Australasia's research capability

Venue

Stanley Burbury Theatre Speaker Theatre 3

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Prof Philip Boyd Institute Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania
  • Dr Andrew Davidson Australian Antarctic Division

Background

Is the Australasian scientific community suitably equipped, skilled and co-ordinated to conduct the strategic research necessary to better understand the effects of climate change on our biota and the feedbacks to global climate? Elevated CO2 concentrations (ocean acidification) and global climate change are simultaneously exposing marine organisms to an array of potential physical and chemical stressors, the net effects of which are largely unknown Detecting and predicting the effects of environmental change on polar marine biota is vital if we are to appraise how the structure and function of polar ecosystems may alter, and hence how the ecosystem services they provide could be impacted. Yet researchers face the daunting challenge of understanding the effects of these environmental changes with limited and often diminishing resources. This workshop seeks to assess the available resources and consider how the biological research community could best deploy the net capability (people, knowledge, materials and instruments) to address key knowledge gaps required to inform policy development, formulate mitigation strategies, and potentially avoid detrimental changes to Antarctic ecosystems.

Option 3: W9 - A strategic approach to scientific writing

Venue

IMAS Conference Room (offsite)

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Dr Tania Raymond Australian Antarctic Division
  • Dr Simon Wright Australian Antarctic Division / Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC / Institute Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania

Background

Written communication is an essential part of scientific research, yet very few scientists have any formal training in scientific writing. Instead, most pick up writing habits and styles from other untrained scientific writers – or from non-scientific writers – to the detriment of their research, their readers and the scientific literature. This workshop will provide strategies and techniques for effective writing, aiming not only to facilitate the writing process but also to produce a paper that others will want to read, easily comprehend and ultimately cite. We will discuss tools for collecting and organising ideas and demonstrate how they can be used to develop a structured narrative that provides a clear, logical path through a document. We will not focus on grammar but will show how text can be structured for maximum clarity and comprehension. This half-day workshop is based on three-day writing retreats previously given to students and staff. It should benefit all scientists, from postgraduate students to seasoned veterans, as well as their reviewers and readership.

Option 4: W10 - Antarctic Nearshore and Terrestrial Observing System (ANTOS)

Venue

Stanley Burbury Theatre Theatre 1

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Dr Dana Bergstrom Australian Antarctic Division

Background

The aim of this workshop is to develop a framework for an Antarctic Near-shore and Terrestrial Observing System, ANTOS Objectives behind the development of ANTOS.

The overarching objectives of ANTOS are to:

  • design and implement a comprehensive and multidisciplinary observing system for Antarctic and subantarctic near-shore and terrestrial ecosystems
  • advocate and guide the development of new observation technologies
  • integrate and coordinate national and international projects
  • unify and harmonise current observation efforts.

Many areas such as the moss beds at Casey and the LTER program in the Dry Valleys have long term observing systems in place. ANTOS aims to link and harmonise such activities into a co-ordinated program to maximise effort, investment outcomes, provide a platform for the new SCAR programs and provide information for use by the CEP and COMNAP.

The workshop will aim to achieve the following:

  • initiate the development of ANTOS
  • identify potential goals of ANTOS
  • identify current and potential locations for long term observing sites.

Prepare documents for presentation to the greater SCAR Life Science’s community at a SCAR workshop in Barcelona, July 2013.

Friday 28 June, 1.00pm-4.00pm

Option 1: W11 - Future multidisciplinary processed-based experiments in the Antarctic Marginal Ice Zone

Venue

Stanley Burbury Theatre Theatre 1

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Dr Guy Williams Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC
  • Dr Klaus Meiners Australian Antarctic Division

Background

Sea ice around Antarctica retreats poleward from its maximum winter extent during spring and summer, imposing rapid and dramatic environment changes that affect biogeochemical cycles and influence global climate. The Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ), the wave-fractured periphery of the sea-ice pack, is the focus of increasing scientific scrutiny as the sea ice zones at both poles adjust to the impacts of climate change. There is a positive feedback between the break-up of the pack from the penetration of wave energy and the increase in melting that drives this expansive seasonal phenomenon. Dramatic blooms in the MIZ supply much of the annual productivity in Antarctic waters but the role of sea ice melt in their formation and their linkage to higher trophic levels is not fully understood. There is a growing impetus for studies in the MIZ to improve understanding and model development of how the physics, biology and biogeochemistry interact across this region and how these interactions will respond to predicted changes in seasonality and forcing. This workshop seeks to bring together key Australian and New Zealand scientists interested in MIZ work from a variety of disciplines, with the goal of preparing an Expression of Interest for a ship-based research experiment through the Australian Antarctic Science program in the 2016/17 season.

There is currently a core group of expertise across both Australian and New Zealand polar research groups that is strategically placed to address the knowledge gaps of the MIZ. This workshop presents an excellent opportunity to bring these groups together.

Option 2: W12 - Winter over Science in Glaciology

Venue

Stanley Burbury Theatre Theatre 3

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Dr Stefan Vogel Australian Antarctic Division / Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC / Institute Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania

Background

The way glaciologist conduct sciences has significantly changed over the 50 years. Year round deployments were the norm in the early IGY and post IGY days. With improvements to transcontinental transportation getting to and from Antarctica has become easier and large advances in the area of computing, remote-sensing and global satellite communication most scientists now deploy only for a few months if not only a few weeks to days, leaving Antarctica and the year round stations to technicians tending to specific projects and personal maintaining the stations and equipment in Antarctica. Long distance traverses are rarely done except for logistic reasons.

Antarctica is still a continent on which we have large data gaps and extremely limited spatial and temporal coverage. Improving such coverage is yet crucial for understanding rate controlling processes, regional specifics, spatial and temporal variability constraining numerical models for future behaviour predictions.

What are reasons for this change? Are we missing out on opportunities to conduct science over a large portion of the year? Are we as a science community obtaining a blurred picture of Antarctica during summer and missing important processes and changes in winter?

The workshop explores these questions focusing on:

  • What kind of measurements would we like to extend over a longer period of the year (including winter)?
  • What are the reasons for not conducting/proposing science in winter?
  • What kind of work are we currently not doing because it is too difficult?
  • What are the difficulties and how to overcome those difficulties?
  • For more information visit glaciowinterscience.weebly.com

Option 3: W13 - An introduction to Qualitative Network Analysis

Venue

Stanley Burbury Theatre Theatre 2

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Dr Jess Melbourne-Thomas Australian Antarctic Division / Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC
  • Dr Ben Raymond Australian Antarctic Division / Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC
  • Dr Simon Wotherspoon Australian Antarctic Division / Institute Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania
  • Dr Andrew Constable Australian Antarctic Division / Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC

Background

Qualitative network analysis is a modelling tool that can be applied to systems of interacting elements, such as food webs, ecosystems, and social-ecological systems. Because it only requires the signs of the interactions (i.e. does element x have a positive, negative, or no effect on element y?), it can be applied even where the details of the system are not well understood. It uses graph theory and matrix algebra to identify the direction of responses of model variables to press perturbation scenarios (i.e. sustained increases or decreases to one or more network components). Key advantages of this approach include the ability to capture feedback effects, as a tool to formalise understanding of how a particular system functions, and as a means to test assumptions about interactions and to explore system-level responses to change (including evaluation of proposed management actions). Recent advances in the use of simulation for qualitative network analysis permit the investigation of larger models than earlier approaches, as well as probabilistic interpretations of simulation outcomes.

In this workshop we provide a brief introduction to the theory behind qualitative network analysis, explain the steps required for model construction (using the drawing tool Dia) and demonstrate the use of a set of R functions to perform analyses. We will provide a set of example models, but will also be encouraging participants to begin to develop models for their own systems and questions of interest. We propose a 3-hour session from 9am-12pm on 27th June, with a maximum of 15 participants. Attendees will be asked to bring their own laptops to the workshop (with Dia and R installed).

Relevant reading for participants

Melbourne-Thomas, J., A. Constable, S. Wotherspoon, and B. Raymond. 2013. Testing Paradigms of Ecosystem Change under Climate Warming in Antarctica. PLoS ONE 8:e55093.

Melbourne-Thomas, J., S. Wotherspoon, B. Raymond, and A. Constable. 2012. Comprehensive evaluation of model uncertainty in qualitative network analyses. Ecological Monographs 82:505–519.

Raymond, B., J. McInnes, J. M. Dambacher, S. Way, and D. M. Bergstrom. 2011. Qualitative modelling of invasive species eradication on subantarctic Macquarie Island. Journal of Applied Ecology 48:181–191.

Option 4: W14 - Leadership in Science

Venue

Humanities Room 548 register first at the information desk and staff will direct you

Workshop convenor(s)

  • Indiah Hodgson-Johnston Institute Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania / Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (Oceania)
  • Sarah Ugalde Institute Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania / Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (Oceania)

Background

Development and application of leadership skills in the scientific and research community is a vital aspect of career development. Early career scientists are exposed to many different types of leadership styles, with advice and mentoring from senior researchers important in career development. The Strategic Science in Antarctica Conference offers early career scientists an opportunity to recognise and develop their own leadership potential, through interaction with a unique selection of senior scientists/policy experts.

APECS (Oceania) will invite a selection of key individuals from the scientific community to briefly share (20 mins – 4-6 speakers) their experiences, goals, and perceptions of career progression and leadership in the field of Antarctic and Southern Ocean research; their definition of leadership; types leadership styles they have experienced; advice to help build confidence and communication skills to better prepare the new generation of scientists for positions of leadership. These presentations will conclude with a short activity identifying different styles and skills of leadership most important for early career researchers in a science context.

The key individuals from the scientific community (e.g. senior scientists/policy experts) will then participate in a Q&A session. The floor will be open for questions from members of APECS, other early career scientists, postgraduates, and final year undergraduate students. Questions will be leadership and communication focused; how to improve and develop leadership skills during the early stages of careers; how best to communicate research outcomes to different stakeholders; and questions raised by the briefs given in the first half of the workshop.

Note: This workshop is aimed at students and early career scientists and is free of charge.

Latest news

  • Conference prize winners
    27 Jun 2013

    The Strategic Science in Antarctica conference concluded yesterday and two days of workshops have commenced. Congratulations to those who were awarded prizes for their contributions to the conference.

  • Watch the welcome message from Australia's Environment Minister
    24 Jun 2013

    In a welcome message via video from Canberra, Australia’s Environment Minister, Tony Burke, reflected on the foresight of earlier decision-makers who agreed to set aside an entire continent for scientific research.

  • Last minute information for attendees
    20 Jun 2013

    There's not too long to wait until the start of the Strategic Science in Antarctica conference, and we hope you’re as excited as we are! Read on for more information about the final program, registration, Twitter, presenters, posters and social functions.

More news…

Key dates

  • 11th June 2013
    Registrations close
  • 21st June 2013
    Registrations at the AAD open for staff
  • 24th June 2013
    Registrations at the venue open
  • 24th June 2013
    Conference commences
  • 26th June 2013
    Conference concludes

More key dates…

This page was last modified on 23 May 2013.