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New microsatellite markers for two Antarctic sea urchin species: Preliminary results on genetic population structure

New microsatellite markers for two Antarctic sea urchin species: Preliminary results on genetic population structure
Cecilia Carrea

Authors

Cecilia Carrea
Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Hobart, Private Bag 129, TAS 7001

Karen Miller
Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Hobart, Private Bag 129, TAS 7001

Abstract

Antarctic benthic species are considered to be particularly vulnerable to climate change due to their high isolation, low growth rate and long life span. The development of highly variable nuclear molecular markers can aid in the understanding of the biology and ecology of such species and hence provide essential information for effective management to preserve the benthic biodiversity of Antarctica. There is a high proportion of brooding species among Antarctic marine invertebrates and evidence of genetic structuring and cryptic speciation has been found for some of them, including a seastar, two amphipods, a pygnogonid, a crustacean and an isopod species. We report the isolation and characterisation of 8 polymorphic microsatellite loci developed for a brooding Antarctic sea urchin species: Abatus ingens (tested on 35 individuals from Davis station), 7 of which were cross amplified for Abatus shackletoni (tested in 16 individuals from Davis station) and one was monomorphic. For A. ingens, we observed four to 18 alleles per locus and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.543 to 0.892. For A. shackletoni, we observed three to 13 alleles per locus and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.145 to 0.848. In addition, we will discuss preliminary results using these markers to study the fine-scale population genetic structure of both brooding species collected near Davis and Dumont D’Urville stations as well as the potential application of such information for conservation purposes.

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Key dates

  • 11th June 2013
    Registrations close
  • 21st June 2013
    Registrations at the AAD open for staff
  • 24th June 2013
    Registrations at the venue open
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    Conference commences
  • 26th June 2013
    Conference concludes

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This page was last modified on 23 September 2013.