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Characterization of insoluble nanoparticles in ice cores from Law Dome, East Antarctica

Characterization of insoluble nanoparticles in ice cores from Law Dome, East Antarctica
Aja Ellis

Authors

Aja Ellis
Curtin University, Perth, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845, Australia

Ross Edwards
Curtin University, Perth, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845, Australia

Arie Van Riessen
Curtin University, Perth, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845, Australia

Andrew Smith
Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Sydney, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232, Australia

Mark Curran
Australian Antarctic Division (AAD), Kingston, Channel Highway, Kingston TAS 7050, Australia
Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC), Hobart, Private Bag 80, Hobart TAS 7001, Australia

Ian Goodwin
Macquarie University, Sydney, Balaclava Road, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia

Wang Feiteng
Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 320 Donggang West Road, Lanzhou, 730000, China

Abstract

Insoluble nanoparticles, in the form of aerosols, have significant affects on climate and biogeochemical cycles. Records of these aerosols are essential for understanding paleoclimate forcing and future climate change. While a large body of research exists with respect to mineral dust particles (micron scale) derived from ice cores and sediment cores, very little is known with regards to the history of insoluble nanoparticles. These particles and their precursors are emitted to the atmosphere from a variety of primary and secondary sources including biomass burning, biogenic, anthropogenic, volcanic, and terrestrial mineral emissions. Ice core records are the only reliable way to study the past history of these particles. Here, we will present new data with regards to the physical and chemical properties of these particles as found in the Law Dome ice core, DSS0506 from East Antarctica.

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Key dates

  • 11th June 2013
    Registrations close
  • 21st June 2013
    Registrations at the AAD open for staff
  • 24th June 2013
    Registrations at the venue open
  • 24th June 2013
    Conference commences
  • 26th June 2013
    Conference concludes

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This page was last modified on 24 September 2013.